You don’t control the guy shouting random things in the street, but you do control how you react to what you hear. Understanding that thoughts (something you experience) are different from thinking (a reaction you engage in) can expose a way out of struggling with your mental health.

In this TedX talk, Dr. Steven Hayes offers several helpful techniques for handling nasty intrusive thoughts and putting some distance between you and the stuff in your head. Check it out:

Cutting out compulsions is a key component of recovery from mental illness. But when we engage in compulsions inside our heads as a reaction to anxiety and depression and other feelings we don’t like, they can sometimes be more difficult to wrap our heads around (pun intended!) than compulsions outside of our heads. In this […]

Cutting out compulsions is an effective approach to recovering from a variety of mental illnesses. And it’s helpful for building better mental health and fitness in general. But sometimes it can be difficult to spot the compulsions. The approach to identifying obsessions and compulsions explained in this video is especially useful for identifying compulsions in […]

Our fears love to latch onto the very things we would never want to have happen. The problem is, the moment we start reacting to the intrusive thoughts with coping, checking, and controlling compulsions, we actually encourage our brains to throw those intrusive thoughts at us even more, and they only get more intense the […]

But you can learn how to swim. When I say that mental illness is like drowning and building better mental health is like learning how to swim, I’m not suggesting that mental illnesses aren’t real biological experiences. Drowning is a very biological experience. If we took some guy that doesn’t know how to swim and […]