Yes. The answer is an unequivocal, irrefutable yes. We can see this in anecdotal personal experiences and in research. Let’s start with an anecdote and then we’ll explore some research and what it might mean for you on your own journey. In the past, I struggled with a bunch of different mental illness diagnoses. The […]

Researchers from the University of Buffalo have found that psychiatric drugs and their metabolized remnants are building up in the brains of fish species in the Great Lakes: Selective Uptake and Bioaccumulation of Antidepressants in Fish from Effluent-Impacted Niagara River Waste treatment facilities don’t remove chemicals like those found in psychiatric medications. This may sound harmless […]

If you saw Matt’s post last week on that Icelandic model for reducing drug use amongst youth–if you didn’t, read it here–you might be wondering: Why can’t we do that in North America? Well, one of the reasons is because the healthcare systems in the US and Canada are heavily invested in what’s known as the “disease model” […]

Can you predict whether a child will develop anxiety or depression based on a brain scan at birth? A study published this February in the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry examined connections between the amygdalae and other areas of the brain to find correlations between those connections and possible symptoms of anxiety […]

I participated in a codesign workshop in Toronto yesterday put on by the Evidence Exchange Network, focused on identifying mental healthcare evidence gathering priorities in the province, and I was so impressed to see that the top three priorities selected by the stakeholders attending were: accessibility, effectiveness, and supporting the voices of those with lived experience. […]

I recently finished reading Jack Meyer’s book The Future of Men, which has completely changed the way I see men. It’s a fascinating collection of stats, stories, and analysis on how we got to the current definition of masculinity, and what we expect(and hope)men to be in the years to come. This month, I’m going to take […]

The Open Patient tells the stories of two brain cancer patients, Steven Keating and Liz Salmi, and their experiences with accessing and sharing their medical data. Great insights into the power of making data accessible to patients and empowering them to lead their care with that data.

Scientists have long puzzled over why some species of birds, with their teeny tiny bird brains, are able to solve complex problems, create tools, recognize their own reflection, find their way home without GPS, form lasting monogamous partnerships, sing, understand causal relationships, and make long-term decisions about resources–all things that you, with your grotesquely oversized adult primate brain, […]

Serotonin is a beautifully named neurotransmitter that plays many important roles in our lives. There’s so much of it floating around in our bodies. Lots in our brains. Even more in our guts (along with that burrito you ate for lunch). But that serotonin might not be doing what you think it’s doing. Serotonin is […]

Recent research from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, published in the American Journal of Physiology — Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology, links early-life stress with increased norepinephrine in the upper gut, potentially leading to indigestion and anxiety problems later in life (in rats). Press release. Study (Full text PDF). Basically, what they showed is […]